From Public Enemy to History Teacher: Sitting Bull in American Popular Culture, 1876-1976

Student First Name: 
Michael
Student Last Name: 
Salgarolo
Student Picture: 
From Public Enemy to History Teacher: Sitting Bull in American Popular Culture, 1876-1976
Project Picture: 
D.F. Barry Portrait vs. Buffalo Bill and the Indians, or Sitting Bull's History Lesson
Expected Year of Graduation: 
2013
Department/Major: 
History
Student Team Members: 
Michael Salgarolo
Mentor(s): 
David J. Silverman, Prof of History
Other Team Members: 
.
Fun Fact About Yourself: 
In addition to my academic pursuits, I was an active member of GW’s Generic Theatre Company during my undergraduate years. I acted in three Generic shows and directed two Freshman Showcase pieces, as well as a full-length production of One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.
Project Abstract: 

Since the Battle of the Little Bighorn in 1876, the Sioux chief Sitting Bull has been one of America’s most well-known Indian figures. My study incorporates newspaper articles, public exhibitions, and feature films to examine how Sitting Bull has been portrayed in American culture. Depictions of Sitting Bull were shaped by popular attitudes toward Native Americans, leading to a shift from depictions of Sitting Bull as a bloodthirsty ‘savage’ in 1876 to his depiction as a symbol of the misrepresentation of Indians in American culture in the 1976 film Buffalo Bill and the Indians, or Sitting Bull’s History Lesson.